Foreign Correspondence

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I’m currently on my second stint as a freelance foreign correspondent.

From 2009 to 2011, I lived in Central Java, Indonesia, writing about volcanoes, President Obama and skin whitening.

I’m currently living in Montevideo, Uruguay. Since there’s not much going on here, I travel frequently to Brazil to work on stories.

Here are a few examples of my work.

1. Eruption of Mount Merapi, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

October-December 2010.

I spent a little over two months covering this deadly event, which killed more than 500 people a few miles from my home in Yogyakarta. The weeks of fear, sleep deprivation and stress only added to my zeal and I think I produced some of my best work in this period.

GlobalPost:

A Feature: “This Volcano Brought to You by Philip Morris”

Hard News: “Indonesia’s volcano threatens city”

The New York Times:

“Indonesians Waiting out Another Disaster”

Production work for PBS:

“Science, Mysticism Meld in Predicting Mount Merapi’s Deadly Eruptions”

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2. Northeastern Brazil’s Killer Drought

February 2014

A devastating drought in northeastern Brazil killed millions of cows, sheep and goats and destroyed tens of millions of tons of crops throughout 2012 and 2013. A 10-day road-trip though the region revealed the true human cost of the historic drought.

Understand the Crisis:  “The biggest disaster you’ve probably never heard of”

How Farmers are Coping with Record Drought: “Feeding cactus to dying cows (VIDEO)”

How the Government is Keeping Folks Alive: “How Brazil keeps people alive while crops and livestock die (VIDEO)”

What’s In Store?: “Brazil’s bad weather riddle: Years ending in 2, years ending in 4”

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3. The Economic Drivers of Brazil’s Protests

October 2013

Following historic riots in Brazil in summer 2013, I set out to understand the underpinnings of the unrest. Economics turned out to be the primary factor pushing people out onto the streets, so in a reporting mission to Sao Paulo, I drilled deep into how Brazil’s economic woes are impacting everyday Brazilians.

How Debt Has Weighed Down the Population: “The shame of a ‘dirty name’ in credit-crazy Brazil”

Skyrocketing Living Costs Drive Up Resentment: “Brazil’s almost paradise: Here’s why they ask for more”

Youth Anger Driven by Economic Helplessness: “Teenage Rebellion, On a Brazilian Budget.”